Article

PDF
Access to the PDF text
Advertising


Free Article !

Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume 52, n° 9
pages 638-652 (novembre 2009)
Doi : 10.1016/j.rehab.2009.07.035
Received : 8 January 2009 ;  accepted : 20 July 2009
The value of intermittent cervical traction in recent cervical radiculopathy
Apport de la traction cervicale intermittente dans la névralgie cervicobrachiale récente
 

A. Jellad a, , Z. Ben Salah a, S. Boudokhane a, H. Migaou a, I. Bahri a, N. Rejeb b
a Service de médecine physique et réadaptation, CHU F. Bourguiba, 1753 Monastir, Tunisia 
b Service de médecine physique et réadaptation, CHU Sahloul, Sousse, Tunisia 

Corresponding author.
Abstract
Objective

Our objective is to assess the effect of mechanical and manual intermittent cervical traction on pain, use of analgesics and disability during the recent cervical radiculopathy (CR).

Methods

We made a prospective randomized study including patients sent for rehabilitation between April 2005 and October 2006. Thirty-nine patients were divided into three groups of 13 patients each. A group (A) treated by conventional rehabilitation with manual traction, a group (B) treated with conventional rehabilitation with intermittent mechanical traction and a third group (C) treated with conventional rehabilitation alone. We evaluated cervical pain, radicular pain, disability and the use of analgesics at baseline, at the end and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment.

Results

At the end of treatment improving of cervical pain, radicular pain and disability is significantly better in groups A and B compared to group C. The decrease in consumption of analgesics is comparable in the three groups. At 6 months improving of cervical and radicular pain and disability is still significant compared to baseline in both groups A and B. The gain in consumption of analgesics is significant in the three groups: A, B and C.

Conclusion

Manual or mechanical cervical traction appears to be a major contribution in the rehabilitation of CR particularly if it is included in a multimodal approach of rehabilitation.

The full text of this article is available in PDF format.
Résumé
Objectifs

Notre objectif est d’évaluer l’effet de la traction cervicale intermittente manuelle et mécanique sur la douleur, la consommation d’antalgiques et le handicap ressenti au cours de la névralgie cervicobrachiale (NCB) récente.

Patients et méthodes

Nous avons réalisé un travail prospectif randomisé incluant des patients adressés pour rééducation fonctionnelle entre avril 2005 et octobre 2006. Trente-neuf patients ont été répartis en trois groupes de 13 patients chacun. Un groupe A traité par rééducation classique avec des tractions manuelles, un groupe B traité par rééducation classique avec traction mécanique intermittente et un troisième groupe C traité par rééducation classique seule. Nous avons évalué la douleur cervicale et radiculaire, le handicap ressenti et la consommation d’antalgiques avant rééducation et à la fin du traitement à un, à trois et à six mois.

Résultats

À la fin du traitement, l’amélioration de la douleur cervicale et radiculaire et du handicap ressenti est significativement meilleure dans les groupes A et B par rapport au groupe C. La diminution de la consommation d’antalgiques est comparable dans les trois groupes. À six mois de recul, le gain en douleur cervicale et radiculaire et en handicap est toujours significatif par rapport au bilan initial dans les deux groupes A et B. Le gain en consommation d’antalgiques est significatif dans les trois groupes : A, B et C.

Conclusion

La traction cervicale manuelle ou mécanique paraît être d’un grand apport dans la rééducation de la NCB ressente particulièrement si elle est incluse dans une approche rééducative multimodale.

The full text of this article is available in PDF format.

Keywords : Cervical radiculopathy, Cervical traction, Physical therapy

Mots clés : Névralgie cervicobrachiale, Traction cervicale, Rééducation


English version
Introduction

Cervical radiculopathy (CR) can be defined as metameric neck pain, which radiates to the arms. It is a common condition, with an annual incidence of around 83 per 100,000 and an increasing prevalence in the 5th decade of life (203 per 100,000) [3].

The most common aetiology (in 70 to 75% of cases) is foramenal compression of the spinal nerve. This can be due to one or several of many factors, including reduction in disc height and anterior and posterior degenerative changes of the uncovertebral and zygapophyseal joints, respectively [1].

Unlike lumbar spine problems, a herniated disc (HD) only accounts for 20 to 25% of cases [18]. Several interventional strategies are used in the management of CR and range from conservative approaches (including physical treatment) to surgery.

In 75% of cases, treatment is conservative and is based on rehabilitation [18]. The rehabilitation programs are generally multifaceted and involve several physical methods, none of which have guaranteed efficacy. Cervical traction (as used in the treatment of post-traumatic neck pain [19]) is also frequently employed in CR [12, 16].

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of intermittent manual or mechanical cervical traction on pain, analgesic consumption and self-perceived disability by patients having recently developed CR.

Patients and methods
Patients

The study population consisted of CR patients referred for rehabilitation treatment. The inclusion criteria were recent CR (i.e. onset within the previous 3 months), involvement of spinal nerve with HD and/or intervertebral disc degeneration confirmed by imaging (computed tomography [CT] and/or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and concordant radiographic and clinical results. The exclusion criteria were a history of surgery or bone-ligament damage to the cervical spine, shoulder disease (rotator cuff syndrome, capsulitis, acromioclavicular arthropathy, shoulder instability or inflammatory arthritis) or carpal tunnel syndrome, ongoing or recent rehabilitation for the current CR and the worsening of pain or intolerance in a manual cervical traction test performed by the clinician during the first consultation. Patients were referred by rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons and neurologists at Monastir University Hospital (Monastir, Tunisia) and medical practitioners in the surrounding region.

Methods

This was a prospective randomized study performed over the period from April 2005 to October 2006. We identified 51 cases of CR; after the exclusion of 12 patients, 39 were successively included and randomly assigned (using a randomization list) to one of three groups (A, B and C). In group A, treatment consisted of a “standard” rehabilitation programme involving physical pain relief methods (ultrasound, infrared and massage), cervical spine mobilisation and muscle strengthening via isometric contraction of flexor and extensor muscles, followed by stretching exercises and self-expansion for the spinal muscles.

Manual, intermittent cervical traction (20 20-second tractions, a 10-second inter-traction rest period) were performed by designated physiotherapists (Fig. 1). A force of around 6kg was applied; this was calculated using a mechanical dynamometer and corresponded to the force that the physiotherapist could exert for 20 successive 20-second repetitions without experiencing major fatigue. The load was reviewed and recorded at the beginning of each manual traction session. In group B, “standard” rehabilitation was combined with mechanical traction in the supine position with a weight-bearing pulley system (Fig. 2). Each session comprised two 25-minute tractions, with a 10-minute rest interval. The weight was gradually increased from five to 12kg. During the traction, the neck was maintained in the most pain-free position (as determined in the manual traction test at the first consultation). Patients in group C received 12 sessions (three per week) of “standard” rehabilitation alone, i.e., in the absence of any traction. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two physiotherapists because it was impractical to assign all patients to a single practitioner. Examinations were performed at the end of the treatment programme and then 1, 3 and 6 months afterwards by a doctor who was blinded to the patients’ treatment group (Fig. 3).



Fig. 1


Fig. 1. 

Manual cervical traction.

Zoom



Fig. 2


Fig. 2. 

The mechanical cervical traction system (weights with a pulley and an occipital head and chin support).

Zoom



Fig. 3


Fig. 3. 

Study design for CR conventional treatment. Patients lost to follow-up.

Zoom

We evaluated cervical pain, radicular pain and self-perceived disability on visual analogue scales (VASs). Analgesic drug consumption was calculated by averaging the daily number of tablets consumed during the week preceding the assessment for each WHO analgesic drug grade.

Statistics

All statistical analyses were performed with SPSS.10 software. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparisons between the three study groups.

The Wilcoxon test was used to evaluate post-rehabilitation changes in the overall study population and in each of the three groups. Lastly, Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to identify correlations between the parameters studied. The significance threshold was set to p <0.05 for all tests.

Results
Characteristics of the study population

We excluded 12 patients due to a history of shoulder diseases (two cases of rotator cuff syndrome, one case of capsulitis and one case of acromioclavicular arthritis), carpal tunnel syndrome (two cases), rehabilitative treatment underway in another clinic (one case) and intolerance in the manual cervical traction test (five cases). The aetiologies of the CR in our study population (n =39) were as follows: a HD in 11 cases (28.2%), a degenerative intervertebral disc in 17 cases (43.6%) and osteoarthritis of the uncovertebral joints in 11 cases (28.2%).

Traction was carried out in an intermediate position in 13 cases, in slight flexion in ten cases and in slight extension in three cases. We noted transient side effects (muscle pain) after mechanical traction (group B) in one patient at the start of the course of treatment. These effects were treated with a 5-day course of analgesics and muscle-relaxant drugs. No side effects were noted in the other two groups. None of the patients was lost to follow-up. The study population includes 39 patients (nine men and 30 women; mean age: 41.6±8 years). Twenty patients (51.3%) were shift workers. Exposure to microtrauma (mechanical vibration or heavy labour) was present in 12 patients (30.7%). There was no history of cervical trauma. The most affected nerve roots were C6 (in 20 cases) and C5 (in ten cases) (Table 1).

There were 13 patients in each group (A, B and C). There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in terms of epidemiological characteristics and clinical parameters at the beginning of the study, except for self-perceived disability (which was felt more keenly in group A) (Table 1).

Change over time in the study parameters in the study population

Cervical & radicular pain and self-perceived disability were significantly relieved at the end of the rehabilitation programme (p <0.0001, p <0.0001 and p =0.001, respectively). Subjective disability decreased further at 1 month post-treatment and continued to decrease until 6 months. A reduction in neck and radicular pain was observed at a month and maintained up to 6 months (Fig. 4).



Fig. 4


Fig. 4. 

Evolution of neck pain, radicular pain and handicap felt in total population.

Zoom

Description of study parameters at the end of the rehabilitation programme in the three groups

Neck pain

Neck pain was significantly relieved at the end of the rehabilitation programme in groups A and B (p =0.009 and p <0.0001). This contrasted with the situation in group C, in which the change was not significant (p =0.23) (Fig. 5).



Fig. 5


Fig. 5. 

Evolution of neck pain in three groups.

Zoom

Radicular pain

Radicular pain was significantly relieved at the end of the rehabilitation programme in groups A and B (p =0.008 and p <0.0001). In group C, there was a slight but insignificant change at the end of the treatment programme (p =0.51) (Fig. 6).



Fig. 6


Fig. 6. 

Evolution of radicular pain in three groups.

Zoom

Self-perceived disability

Self-perceived disability was significantly reduced at the end of the programme in groups A and B (p =0.044 and p <0.0001, respectively). In group C, the improvement was not significant (p =0.67) (Fig. 7).



Fig. 7


Fig. 7. 

Evolution of handicap felt in three groups.

Zoom

Analgesic consumption

Analgesic consumption fell significantly in groups A, B and C (p =0.021, p <0.0001 and p =0.012, respectively) (Fig. 8). At the end of the rehabilitation programme, the three groups did not differ significantly in terms of the patient distribution within the analgesic grades (p =0.13) (Table 2).



Fig. 8


Fig. 8. 

Evolution of analgesic consumption in three groups.

Zoom

Description of study parameters over the 6-month follow-up period and for the three study groups

Neck pain

In group A (manual cervical traction), a reduction in neck pain was noted at 1 month but did not improve further at 3 and 6 months (Fig. 5). At 6 months, the difference was still significant, compared with the initial assessment (p =0.002). In group B (mechanical traction), the improvement in neck pain relief was stable from the end of the treatment programme until 3 months, with a non-significant improvement at 6 months. At 6 months, the difference was highly significant compared with the initial assessment (p <0.0001). In group C (without traction), there were no significant changes in neck pain (compared with the baseline) during or after treatment (p =0.70) for the pain at 6 months, compared with the initial assessment. Hence, neck pain was significantly reduced at the end of the treatment programme in groups A and B, compared with group C (p =0.003). At subsequent time points, the difference did not increase further by a significant amount (Fig. 9).



Fig. 9


Fig. 9. 

Evolution of neck pain gain (mm) in three groups.

Zoom

Radicular pain

In group A, radicular pain fell until the 3rd month and then showed a non-significant increase at 6 months (Fig. 6). At 6 months, the difference was significant when compared with baseline (p =0.001). In group B, the change over time was marked by continuous improvement until 6 months post-treatment; the difference at this last time point was significant, compared with the initial assessment (p =0.026). In group C, the pain rating rose and fell over the measurement period, with an increase at the end of the treatment programme, a decrease at 1 month and the increases at 3 and 6 months. At 6 months, the improvement was not significant when compared with the initial assessment (p =0.14). At the end of the treatment programme, radicular pain relief was significantly greater in groups A and B than in group C (p =0.001). At subsequent time points, the difference did not increase further by a significant amount (Fig. 10).



Fig. 10


Fig. 10. 

Evolution of radicular pain gain (mm) in three groups.

Zoom

Self-perceived disability

In groups A and B, perceived disability fell continuously until the 6th month (Fig. 7). At 6 months, the difference was significant, compared with the initial assessment in group A (p <0.0001) and B (p =0.001). In group C, the perceived disability was slightly lower at the end of the treatment programme and then increased until the 6th month. At 6 months, the difference was not significant when compared with the initial assessment (p =0.75). At the end of the treatment programme, the reduction in perceived disability was significantly greater in groups A and B, compared with group C (p =0.032). At the following controls, the difference was not significant (Fig. 11).



Fig. 11


Fig. 11. 

Evolution of handicap felt gain (mm) in three groups.

Zoom

Analgesic consumption

In groups A, B and C, changes in analgesic consumption were characterized by a significant decrease at 1 month, with no further change until 6 months (Fig. 8). At this last time point, the difference was significant, compared with the initial consumption (p <0.0001 for groups A and B and p =0.003 for group C). The three groups did not significantly differ in terms of consumption of analgesics for any of the time points (Fig. 12). The groups’ distributions in terms of the analgesic grade were similar at all the time points other than 6 months, at which time patients in group C were significantly more likely (p =0.001) to use grade II analgesics than patients in groups A and B (Table 2).



Fig. 12


Fig. 12. 

Evolution of analgesic consumption gain (tablets/day) in three groups.

Zoom

Correlation analysis

At 6 months, the decrease in perceived disability was correlated with the decrease in neck pain (p <0.05). The decrease in neck pain was also correlated with the decrease in radicular pain (p <0.01). It is clear that the more intense the neck and radicular pain and the greater the perceived disability and analgesic consumption at baseline, the greater the improvement at 6 months for each of these parameters (p <0.01).

Discussion

The frequencies of the various CR aetiologies in the study population were similar to data reported in the literature [1]. Degenerative phenomena affecting the intervertebral disc and the uncovertebral joint were more common than HD.

The effect of cervical traction (especially in the long term) is subject to debate. Some authors suggest that the technique is less effective in chronic CR (i.e. a history of CR of over 3 months) [5, 7, 15, 18]. Our work shows a positive impact of combining intermittent mechanical or manual cervical traction with a “standard” rehabilitation program for recent CR. This effect was observed for neck and radicular pain and self-perceived disability (although mainly at the end of the treatment programme). The effect of traction on analgesic intake was smaller and did not differ significantly from that seen with standard rehabilitation. In contrast, patients in the standard rehabilitation group consumed significantly more grade II analgesics at 6 months than either of the traction groups. It is important to note that tolerance of a manual cervical traction test was one of our inclusion criteria.

In the literature, several modes of traction have been evaluated for the treatment of neck and radicular pain resulting from cervical spondylosis or HD. Several authors report favourable results. Zylbergold and Piper [26] demonstrated the contribution of intermittent cervical traction to the treatment of cervical diseases in terms of pain and recovery of spinal mobility (flexion and rotation). A three-week protocol with daily, vertical, intermittent cervical traction, combined with the wearing of a cervical collar and administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and muscle-relaxants, demonstrated its effectiveness in recent CR (onset within the preceding 2 weeks) in young patients with a cervical HD larger than 4mm [5]. However, the latter study can be criticized in view of the small number of patients (n =4) and the lack of a control group. It appears that this type of recent CR is more responsive to cervical traction. Indeed, it is known that a cellular mechanism is involved in the regression of HDs when the latter are exposed to the vascular environment of the epidural space; however, large HDs are absorbed more slowly and respond better to traction treatment, especially when initiated early [11].

A combination of cervical traction and posture correction exercises has been applied to patients with cervical spondylosis. The resulting clinical improvement was significant and similar to that obtained by posture correction exercises and NSAID treatment (borderline superiority, according to the authors: p =0.06) [22]. The retrospective analysis by Swezey et al. [23] demonstrated the efficacy of vertical intermittent cervical traction in the sitting position on neck and radicular pain in grade I to III spondylosis (according to the Quebec Task Force classification), with a 81% reduction in symptoms. The duration of the twice-daily traction sessions was 5minutes. This study also lacked a control group. Conservative treatment with a programme of physical exercise, cervical traction, patient education and administration of oral NSAIDs led to effective treatment in 24 out of 26 patients with CR due to HD. One year later, patient satisfaction remained high and most subjects had resumed their previous activities [20]. However, in the absence of a control group and considering the high number of types of treatments given, it is difficult to ascribe these results to cervical traction.

In the study by Cleland et al. [4], cervical manipulation and strengthening exercises for the scapulothoracic muscles and the deep flexor muscles in the neck were combined with cervical traction in the treatment of 11 consecutive patients referred for rehabilitation of CR. The authors noted that after an average of seven sessions, ten of the 11 patients showed significant improvements in terms of pain and function at the end of the treatment programme and 6 months later. In a controlled pilot study [17], cervical weightbath traction (combined with the McKenzie exercises and electrotherapy) was found to be of great value in CR, when compared with exercises and electrotherapy alone. Pain, spinal mobility, function and quality of life parameters were improved at the end of a 15-session treatment protocol and 3 months later. The authors suggested the use of cervical weightbath traction in cases of radicular pain caused by disc protrusion, an HD (in the absence of motor impairment) or cervical spondylosis. In a randomized, controlled study, Joghataei et al. [12] demonstrated that intermittent cervical traction in the supine position resulted in an immediate, short-term improvement in gripping strength (after 3 weeks) in the case of unilateral C7 CR. However, they did not observed mid-term any superiority of this technique relative to conventional rehabilitative treatment. This early effect of spinal traction has been reported in radiographic studies showing a reduction in the size of the HD under traction; this is probably related to the creation of negative pressure in the intervertebral disc [2]. In addition, Hattori et al. [8] have shown that vertical intermittent cervical traction in the sitting position with 15 degrees of cervical spine flexion led to pain relief and improved nerve conduction in spondylotic myelopathy and, in particular, CR. This effect may be related to improvement in the blood supply to nerve structures [2, 8, 10, 15, 20]. Lecocq’s literature review [13] stated that cervical traction has several different modes of action, with a very small increase in the intervertebral space (a few tenths of a millimetre) and a reduction in intradisc pressure, with a possible HD suction effect. The HD can also be pushed back by tension in the posterior longitudinal ligament. In terms of the muscles, the effect of cervical traction is characterized by stabilization of (or even an increase in) activity of the trapezius muscle during the first 3 to 6minutes. The inhibitory “gate control” effect on nociceptive influx transmission requires experimental confirmation. Furthermore, placebo and psychological effects must be considered when analysing the effect of cervical traction. In view of these findings, we can put forward several anatomical and physiological explanations for the improvement of our patients in group B (mechanical traction). However, in group A (manual traction), psychological and placebo effects probably had a more important role.

The effect of traction on the intervertebral space (with varying cervical spine postures) has been evaluated by several authors. Wong et al. [25] noted that the anterior and posterior intervertebral spaces were increased by traction when in a neutral position and with 30° of flexion. The increase in intervertebral space especially occurred in the C4-C5 disc (12%) in the neutral position and in the C2-C3 disc with 30° of flexion. The posterior intervertebral space mainly increased near the C6-C7 disc (37%) in the neutral position and the C6-C7 (20%) and C5-C6 (19%) discs with 30° of flexion. In the study by Hseuh et al. [10], the greatest enlargement of the posterior intervertebral space was noted with 30° of flexion for the C4-C5 and C5-C6 discs and with 35° of flexion for the C6-C7 and C7-T1 discs. This effect was greater with a weight between 15 and 18kg but use of the latter resulted in neck pain after traction. Vaughn et al. [24] used cervical traction in 20 volunteers with 0° and 30° of cervical spine flexion. They noted a significantly greater increase in the anterior intervertebral space for all cervical spine segments with 0° of flexion than with 30° of flexion. The increase in the posterior intervertebral space was also significant, although the difference between the 0° and 30° of flexion positions was not statistically significant. In our series, the cervical spine was in a neutral or slightly extended in 16 of the 26 patients (61.5%) being treated with manual or mechanical traction. Bearing in mind the above-mentioned literature data, we believe that cervical spine traction in the flexion position does not have a greater effect on the posterior intervertebral space and does not provide superior analgesic efficacy.

The CT study by Sari et al. [21] confirmed the biomechanical effect of traction on the cervical spine from C2 to C7, with an elongation of 1.39mm, a reduction in disc protrusion and an increase in medullar canal surface area of 11.21mm2. MRI has been used to assess the effect of cervical traction on the HD in flexion posture and showed complete resolution or significant reduction of the disc protrusion in 72% of cases with a load of 13.6kg (30 pounds) [2]. Liu et al. [14] also used MRI to assess the effect of traction on the neural foramen between the 2nd and 7th cervical vertebrae. This was performed in the supine position with a neutral cervical spine posture and led to an increase in the height of the foramen (averaging 3.75, 8.67 and 10.43% for consecutive weights of 5, 10 and 15kg). The increase in the foramen surface area averaged 5.81, 16.56 and 18.9% for the same series of loads. The authors did not find a significant difference between the 10 and 15kg loads in terms of foramen height and surface area.

In the present study, manual traction below 6kg gave similar results to mechanical traction with up to 12kg. This does not confirm the mechanical effect of manual traction (at least on the ligaments and joint structures) but emphasizes the value of its effect on muscle structures in recent CR. The reduction in pain from muscle structures may explain the decrease in analgesic consumption, which was similar in the three study groups. The contribution of muscle structures almost certainly influenced the tolerance of the manual traction test performed during the first physical examination and thus the inclusion of patients in our study. Given the variability in the results of studies assessing the effect of rehabilitation and the absence of a unanimous consensus on the treatment of CR, Cleland et al. [3] attempted to identify factors that were predictive of a good short-term outcome for physical treatment in CR. These authors identified eight factors: three collected at the interview (age<54 years, non-dominant arm pain and the lack of pain when looking downwards), one factor obtained during the physical examination (neck flexion>30°) and four factors related to the physical methods used (mechanical cervical traction, dorsal spine manipulation, no soft tissue mobilization and a multimodal approach). The combination of the first three factors with the multimodal approach involving cervical traction, manipulation and strengthening the deep neck flexors was likely to be effective in 90% of cases. Given the difficulty of finding a standard rehabilitation protocol that is effective in CR, the use of a multimodal approach involving manual or mechanical cervical traction seems to be of value. We recommend the application of criteria for selecting patients for intermittent cervical traction; in our opinion, these should include a history of disease of less than 3 months, tolerance of the cervical traction test and choice of the cervical spine posture – criteria that have to be validated before prescribing this rehabilitation protocol. Lastly, we note that the lack of patient blinding in our study is a potential source of methodological bias, since patients from group C knew that they would not receive traction therapy.

Conclusion

Treatment of CR is primarily conservative and involves a multimodal rehabilitation approach. Intermittent cervical traction plays an important role when the indication is unambiguous [9, 21]. A disease history below 3 months, good tolerance of the manual traction test and correct choice of the posture of the cervical spine are factors that increasing the likelihood of a good outcome. Chronic CR is a poor indication for intermittent cervical traction. In cases of refractory radicular pain, a progressive neurological deficit or spondylotic myelopathy, surgery is legitimate [6]. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of cervical traction and underpin the technique’s indications in CR.

Version française
Introduction

La névralgie cervicobrachiale (NCB) est une douleur naissant au cou et irradiant vers le membre supérieur de topographie métamérique. C’est une pathologie fréquente avec une incidence annuelle aux alentours de 83 pour 100 000 et une prévalence qui augmente au cours de la cinquième décennie (203 pour 100 000) [3]. L’étiologie la plus fréquente (70 à 75 %) est la compression d’une racine cervicale au niveau du foramen de conjugaison secondaire à la diminution de la hauteur du disque intervertébral et aux phénomènes dégénératifs articulaires uncovertébraux en avant et zygapophysaires en arrière [1]. Contrairement au rachis lombaire, la hernie discale (HD) ne représente que 20 à 25 % des étiologies [18]. Plusieurs stratégies d’intervention sont utilisées dans la prise en charge de la NCB allant des approches conservatrices, incluant le traitement physique, à la chirurgie.

Dans trois quarts des cas, le traitement est conservateur médical et rééducatif [18]. Les programmes de rééducation sont multiples et comportent plusieurs moyens physiques sans certitude de leur efficacité. La traction cervicale, utilisée dans les cervicalgies post-traumatiques [19], figure parmi les moyens physiques les plus fréquemment utilisés dans la NCB [12, 16].

Notre objectif à travers ce travail est l’évaluation de l’effet de la traction cervicale intermittente manuelle ou mécanique sur la douleur, la consommation d’antalgiques et le handicap ressenti au cours de la NCB récente.

Patients et méthodes
Patients

Notre population est formée de patients adressés pour un traitement rééducatif d’une NCB.

Les critères d’inclusion sont une NCB récente de durée d’évolution inférieure à trois mois, un conflit radiculaire avec une HD et/ou une discarthrose confirmée par l’imagerie (une tomodensitométrie et/ou une imagerie par résonance magnétique) avec concordance radioclinique. Les critères d’exclusion sont des antécédents de chirurgie ou de lésions ostéoligamentaires du rachis cervical, les antécédents de pathologies de l’épaule (syndrome de la coiffe des rotateurs, capsulite rétractile, arthropathie acromioclaviculaire, épaule instable et rhumatisme inflammatoire), les antécédents de syndrome du canal carpien, un traitement rééducatif déjà accompli ou débuté pour le problème actuel de NCB et l’aggravation des douleurs ou la non tolérance du test de traction cervicale manuelle réalisé par le clinicien lors de la première consultation. Les patients sont adressés par les rhumatologues, les orthopédistes et les neurologues du CHU de la ville de Monastir (Tunisie) ainsi que par les praticiens libéraux de la région.

Méthodes

Il s’agit d’un travail prospectif randomisé réalisé durant la période allant d’avril 2005 à octobre 2006. Nous avons répertorié 51 cas de NCB. Douze patients ont été exclus et 39 ont été inclus successivement et répartis au hasard, en s’aidant d’une liste de randomisation, en trois groupes : A, B et C. Dans le groupe A, le traitement comportait une rééducation « classique » comprenant des moyens physiques à visée antalgique (ultrasons, infrarouges et massages décontracturants), des mobilisations douces du rachis cervical, un renforcement musculaire par des contractions isométriques des muscles fléchisseurs et extenseurs suivi d’étirements et par des exercices d’auto-agrandissement pour les spinaux. Des tractions cervicales manuelles intermittentes (20 tractions de 20 secondes chacune avec dix secondes de repos entre les tractions) ont été réalisées par les kinésithérapeutes, chacun pour ses patients correspondent (Fig. 1). La force développée par les kinésithérapeutes est aux alentours de 6kg. Cette charge a été calculée grâce à un dynamomètre mécanique et correspond à la force que peut développer les kinésithérapeutes pendant 20 secondes à raisons de 20 répétitions successives sans éprouver de fatigue importante. Elle a été mémorisée et rappelée au début de chaque séance de traction manuelle. Dans le groupe B, la rééducation « classique » a été associée aux tractions mécaniques en décubitus dorsal avec un système de poids-poulies (Fig. 2). Au cours de chaque séance, il a été réalisé deux tractions de 25minutes chacune intercalées par un intervalle de repos de dix minutes. Le poids est augmenté progressivement de cinq à 12kg. L’axe du cou au cours des tractions est déterminé en fonction de la posture antalgique vérifiée par le test de traction manuelle lors de la première consultation. Les patients du groupe C ont été traités par une rééducation « classique » seule. Chaque protocole comportait 12 séances réalisées à raison de trois par semaine. Les patients ont été répartis entre deux kinésithérapeutes après tirage au sort puisque sur le plan pratique, il nous a été difficile de confier tous les patients à un seul kinésithérapeute. Les contrôles ont été faits à la fin du traitement, à un, trois et six mois par un médecin ne connaissant pas la nature du traitement prescrit (Fig. 3).



Fig. 1


Fig. 1. 

Traction cervicale manuelle.

Zoom



Fig. 2


Fig. 2. 

Traction cervicale mécanique (système de poids-poulies avec une têtière à appui occipital et mentonnier).

Zoom



Fig. 3


Fig. 3. 

Déroulement de l’étude.

Zoom

Nous avons évalué la douleur cervicale et radiculaire ainsi que le handicap ressenti sur une échelle visuelle analogique (EVA). L’évaluation de la consommation d’antalgiques a été faite par le calcul de la moyenne quotidienne du nombre de comprimés consommés au cours de la semaine précédent l’évaluation et par le classement en fonction des paliers OMS.

Statistiques

Pour l’étude statistique, nous avons utilisé le logiciel SPSS.10. Pour comparer les paramètres d’étude entre les trois groupes, nous avons utilisé le test de Kruskal Wallis. Pour juger des modifications survenues suite au programme de rééducation dans la population globale et au sein des trois groupes, nous avons utilisé le test de Wilcoxon. Le coefficient de corrélation non paramétrique de Spearman a été utilisé pour rechercher les corrélations entre les paramètres étudiés. Le degré de signification a été fixé à p <0,05.

Résultats
Caractéristiques des populations d’étude

Nous avons exclu 12 patients en raison d’antécédents : de pathologies de l’épaule (deux cas de syndrome de la coiffe des rotateurs, un cas de capsulite et un cas d’arthropathie acromioclaviculaire), de canal carpien (deux cas), de traitement rééducatif déjà débuté dans une autre structure (un cas) et la non tolérance du test de traction (cinq cas). Sur le plan des étiologies de la NCB dans notre population d’étude (n =39), il s’agit d’une HD dans 11 cas (28,2 %), d’une discopathie dans 17 cas (43,6 %) et d’une uncarthrose dans 11 cas (28,2 %). La traction a été réalisée en position intermédiaire dans 13 cas, en légère flexion dans dix cas et en légère extension dans trois cas. Nous avons noté des effets secondaires transitoires (douleurs musculaires) après traction mécanique (groupe B) chez un seul patient au début du traitement. Ils ont été jugulés par un traitement antalgique et myorelaxant pendant cinq jours. Aucun effet secondaire n’a été noté dans les deux autres groupes. Aucun patient n’est perdu de vue au cours de l’étude.

La population étudiée comprend 39 patients ; neuf hommes et 30 femmes, d’âge moyen 41,6±8 ans. Vingt patients (51,3 %) occupent un travail posté. La notion de microtraumatismes (vibrations mécaniques, travaux de force) est présente chez 12 malades (30,7 %). Il n’y a pas d’antécédents de traumatisme cervical. Les racines nerveuses les plus concernées sont C6 20 fois et C5 dix fois (Tableau 1).

Le nombre de patients est de 13 pour chaque groupe (A, B et C). Il n’y a pas de différence statistique significative entre les trois groupes sur le plan des caractéristiques épidémiologiques et des paramètres cliniques en début d’étude sauf pour le handicap ressenti qui était plus important dans le groupe A (Tableau 1).

Évolution des paramètres étudiés dans la population globale

La douleur cervicale et radiculaire ainsi que le handicap ressenti ont été améliorés de façon significative à la fin du traitement avec respectivement p <0,0001, p <0,0001 et p =0,001. Cette amélioration s’est poursuivie jusqu’à six mois pour le handicap ressenti. Pour la douleur cervicale et radiculaire, l’amélioration s’est poursuivie jusqu’à un mois et s’est maintenue jusqu’à six mois (Fig. 4).



Fig. 4


Fig. 4. 

Évolution de la douleur cervicale et radiculaire et du handicap ressenti dans la population générale.

Zoom

Évolution des paramètres étudiés à la fin du protocole rééducatif dans les trois groupes

Douleur cervicale

Elle a été améliorée de façon significative dans les groupes A et B (p =0,009 et p <0,0001), contrairement au groupe C dans lequel l’évolution a été non significative (p =0,23) (Fig. 5).



Fig. 5


Fig. 5. 

Évolution de la cervicalgie dans les trois groupes.

Zoom

Douleur radiculaire

Elle a été améliorée de façon significative à la fin du traitement dans les groupes A et B (p =0,008 et p <0,0001). Dans le groupe C, il y avait une aggravation non significative à la fin du traitement (p =0,51) (Fig. 6).



Fig. 6


Fig. 6. 

Évolution de la radiculalgie dans les trois groupes.

Zoom

Handicap ressenti

Il a été amélioré de façon significative à la fin du traitement dans les groupes A et B (p =0,044 et p <0,0001). Dans le groupe C, l’amélioration a été non significative (p =0,67) (Fig. 7).



Fig. 7


Fig. 7. 

Évolution du handicap ressenti dans les trois groupes.

Zoom

Consommation d’antalgiques

Elle a été réduite de façon significative dans les trois groupes A, B et C (p =0,021, p <0,0001 et p =0,012) (Fig. 8). À la fin du traitement, la différence entre les trois groupes sur le plan de la répartition des patients selon les paliers d’antalgiques est non significative (p =0,13) (Tableau 2).



Fig. 8


Fig. 8. 

Évolution de la consommation quotidienne d’antalgiques dans les trois groupes.

Zoom

Modes évolutifs des différents paramètres sur les six mois de suivi dans les trois groupes d’étude

Douleur cervicale

Dans le groupe A (traction cervicale manuelle), l’amélioration en termes de cervicalgie a été notée jusqu’à un mois, puis l’évolution a été caractérisée par une stagnation à trois et à six mois (Fig. 5). À six mois, la différence est toujours significative par rapport au bilan initial (p =0,002).

Dans le groupe B (traction mécanique), l’évolution de la cervicalgie a été en plateau de la fin du traitement au troisième mois avec une amélioration non significative au sixième mois. À six mois, la différence est très significative par rapport au bilan initial (p <0,0001).

Dans le groupe C (sans traction), l’évolution de la cervicalgie a été marquée par une aggravation non significative jusqu’au premier mois, puis une amélioration non significative jusqu’au sixième mois. À six mois, l’évolution est non significative par rapport au bilan initial (p =0,70).

Le gain en termes de cervicalgie est significativement meilleur dans les groupes A et B par rapport au groupe C à la fin du traitement (p =0,003). Aux contrôles suivants, la différence est non significative (Fig. 9).



Fig. 9


Fig. 9. 

Comparaison de l’évolution du gain en EVA cervicalgie (mm) entre les trois groupes.

Zoom

Douleur radiculaire

Dans le groupe A, la douleur radiculaire est améliorée jusqu’au troisième mois avec une aggravation non significative au sixième mois (Fig. 6). À six mois, la différence est significative par rapport à l’état initial (p =0,001).

Dans le groupe B, l’évolution a été marquée par une amélioration continue jusqu’au sixième mois. À six mois, la différence est significative par rapport au bilan initial (p =0,026).

Dans le groupe C, l’évolution a été fluctuante, marquée par une aggravation à la fin du traitement puis une amélioration au premier mois et une tendance à l’aggravation au troisième et au sixième mois. À six mois, l’amélioration n’est pas significative par rapport au bilan initial (p =0,14).

Le gain en termes de radiculalgie est significativement meilleur dans les groupes A et B par rapport au groupe C à la fin du traitement (p =0,001). Aux contrôles suivants, la différence est non significative (Fig. 10).



Fig. 10


Fig. 10. 

Comparaison de l’évolution du gain en EVA radiculalgie (mm) entre les trois groupes.

Zoom

Handicap ressenti

Dans les groupes A et B, le handicap ressenti a été amélioré de façon continue jusqu’au sixième mois (Fig. 7). À six mois, la différence est significative par rapport au bilan initial dans le groupe A (p <0,0001) et B (p =0,001).

Dans le groupe C, le handicap ressenti a été légèrement réduit à la fin du traitement puis majoré jusqu’au sixième mois. À six mois, la différence est non significative par rapport au bilan initial (p =0,75).

Le gain en termes de handicap ressenti est significativement meilleur dans les groupes A et B par rapport au groupe C à la fin du traitement (p =0,032). Aux contrôles suivants, la différence est non significative (Fig. 11).



Fig. 11


Fig. 11. 

Comparaison de l’évolution du gain en EVA handicap (mm) entre les trois groupes.

Zoom

Consommation d’antalgiques

Dans les trois groupes A, B et C, l’évolution de la consommation d’antalgique a été caractérisée par une diminution significative au premier mois, puis une stagnation jusqu’au sixième mois (Fig. 8). À six mois, la différence reste significative par rapport à la consommation initiale avec p <0,0001 (groupes A et B) et p =0,003 (groupe C). La diminution de consommation d’antalgiques n’est pas significativement différente entre les trois groupes au cours des différents contrôles (Fig. 12). En revanche, la répartition des deux paliers en fonction des groupes est comparable lors des différents contrôles sauf à six mois ou les antalgiques de palier II sont utilisés par un nombre de patients significativement plus important dans le groupe C comparé aux groupes A et B (p =0,001) (Tableau 2).



Fig. 12


Fig. 12. 

Comparaison de l’évolution du gain en consommation d’antalgiques (comprimés/jour) entre les trois groupes.

Zoom

Étude des corrélations

À six mois, la diminution du handicap ressenti est corrélée avec la diminution des cervicalgies (p <0,05). La régression des cervicalgies a été corrélée à la régression des radiculalgies (p <0,01).

Il est mis en évidence que plus la douleur cervicale et radiculaire est intense, le handicap profond et la consommation d’antalgique importante en début du traitement : plus l’amélioration obtenue au sixième mois, pour chacun de ces paramètres, est significative (p <0,01).

Discussion

La fréquence des différentes étiologies de la NCB retrouvées dans notre population est comparable aux données de la littérature [1]. Les phénomènes dégénératifs affectant le disque intervertébral et les articulations unciformes sont plus fréquents que la HD.

L’effet de la traction cervicale, surtout à long terme, est variable selon les auteurs. Son efficacité serait moindre dans les NCB anciennes évoluant depuis plus de trois mois [5, 7, 15, 18]. Notre travail met en évidence un impact bénéfique de l’association de la traction cervicale mécanique ou manuelle intermittente au programme de rééducation « classique » dans la NCB récente. Cet apport est observé sur la douleur cervicale et radiculaire et sur le handicap ressenti essentiellement à la fin du traitement. L’effet est moins important sur la quantité d’antalgiques consommée sans différence statistique avec la rééducation « classique ». En revanche, à six mois, les patients du groupe de rééducation « classique » consomment des antalgiques de palier II de façon significativement plus importante que les deux groupes de traction. Il est intéressant de noter que nous avons considéré la tolérance du test de traction cervicale manuelle comme un facteur d’inclusion dans notre étude.

Dans la littérature, plusieurs modes de traction ont été évalués dans le traitement des douleurs cervicales et radiculaires sur une arthrose cervicale ou une HD. Plusieurs auteurs rapportent des résultats favorables.

Zylbergold et Piper [26] ont démontré l’apport de la traction cervicale intermittente dans le traitement des pathologies cervicales sur le plan de la douleur et de la récupération de la mobilité rachidienne en flexion et en rotation.

Un protocole étalé sur trois semaines comportant des tractions cervicales verticales intermittentes quotidiennes, associées au port d’un collier cervical et à un traitement médicamenteux à base d’anti-inflammatoires non stéroïdien (AINS) et de décontracturants musculaires a démontré son efficacité dans les NCB récentes évoluant depuis moins de deux semaines chez des sujets jeunes ayant une HD cervicale de plus de 4mm [5]. Mais cette étude est critiquable à cause du faible nombre de patients (n =4) et de l’absence de groupe contrôle. Il apparaît que ce type de NCB récentes répond mieux aux tractions cervicales. En effet, il est connu qu’un mécanisme cellulaire participe à la régression des HD lorsqu’elles sont exposées à l’environnement vasculaire de l’espace épidural, mais à cause de leur taille, les HD volumineuses se résorbent plus lentement et répondent mieux à ce type de traitement en particulier quand il est installé précocement [11].

La traction cervicale associée à des exercices de correction posturale a été proposée chez des patients porteurs d’une arthrose cervicale. Elle a entraîné une amélioration clinique significative mais équivalente à celle obtenue par les exercices de correction posturale associés au traitement par AINS (la supériorité a été jugée, par les auteurs, proche de la signification : p =0,06) [22].

Le travail rétrospectif de Swezey et al. [23] a démontré l’efficacité de la traction cervicale intermittente verticale en position assise sur des cervicalgies et des radiculalgies compliquant une cervicarthrose stade I à III selon la classification de la Quebec Task Force avec un taux d’amélioration des symptômes de 81 %. La durée de la traction était de cinq minutes à raison de deux séances quotidiennes. Dans cette étude également, nous notons l’absence de groupe contrôle.

Un programme thérapeutique conservateur comportant des exercices physiques spécifiques, des tractions cervicales, de l’éducation thérapeutique et la prise d’AINS per os, a permis de traiter efficacement 24 patients parmi 26 présentant une NCB sur HD. À un an de recul, la satisfaction des patients reste importante avec une reprise des activités antérieures dans la majorité des cas [20]. Mais, en l’absence de groupe contrôle et vu le nombre de traitements associés, il est difficile d’attribuer ces bons résultats aux seules tractions cervicales.

Dans le travail de Cleland et al. [4], des manipulations cervicales et des exercices de renforcement des muscles fléchisseurs profonds du cou et des muscles scapulothoraciques ont été associés à la traction cervicale dans le traitement de 11 patients consécutifs adressés pour rééducation d’une NCB. Les auteurs ont noté qu’après une moyenne de sept séances, dix patients parmi les 11 traités ont été nettement améliorés sur le plan de la douleur et de la fonction en fin du traitement et à six mois de recul.

L’effet de la traction cervicale dans l’eau a été également évalué dans une étude pilote contrôlée [17]. Les résultats ont montré que ce type de traction, associé à la gymnastique de type McKenzie et à l’électrothérapie, est d’un grand intérêt dans la NCB comparé à la gymnastique et à l’électrothérapie pratiquées seules. Les paramètres douleurs, mobilité rachidienne, fonction et qualité de vie ont été améliorés dès la fin du protocole thérapeutique de 15 séances ainsi qu’à trois mois de recul. Les auteurs de ce travail proposent la traction dans l’eau pour les cas de radiculalgie sur une saillie discale ou sur une HD sans déficit moteur ou sur une discarthrose cervicale.

Joghataei et al. [12] ont démontré dans une étude randomisée contrôlée que la traction cervicale intermittente en décubitus dorsal entraînait une amélioration immédiate de la force de prise à court terme (trois semaines) en cas d’atteinte unilatérale de la racine cervicale C7. Mais ils n’ont pas noté de supériorité de cette technique par rapport au traitement rééducatif classique à moyen terme. Cet effet précoce de la traction vertébrale a été rapporté dans des études radio-anatomiques qui ont montré une réduction de la taille de la HD sous traction probablement en rapport avec la création d’une pression négative dans le disque intervertébral [2]. Par ailleurs, Hattori et al. [8] ont démontré que la traction cervicale intermittente verticale en position assise et en flexion du rachis cervical de 15° entraînait une amélioration de la symptomatologie douloureuse au cours de la myélopathie cervicarthrosique et surtout au cours de la NCB avec une amélioration de la conduction nerveuse. Cet effet serait en rapport avec une amélioration de la vascularisation des structures nerveuses [2, 8, 10, 15, 20]. Dans sa revue de la littérature, Lecocq et al. [13] ont rapporté les différents modes d’action possibles de la traction cervicale. Il s’agit d’un agrandissement des espaces intervertébraux est très minime (quelques dixièmes de millimètres) et de la diminution de la pression intradiscale avec un possible phénomène de succion de la HD. Cette dernière peut également être repoussée par la tension du ligament longitudinal postérieur. Sur le plan musculaire, l’action de la traction cervicale est caractérisée par une stabilisation, voire même une augmentation de l’activité du trapèze supérieur pendant les trois à six premières minutes de traction. L’effet inhibiteur de la transmission des influx nociceptifs par le biais du « gatecontrôle » médullaire nécessite une confirmation par des preuves expérimentales. Les effets placébo et psychologiques doivent être pris en compte. En vue de ces constatations, nous pouvons trouver plusieurs explications anatomophysiologiques à l’amélioration de nos patients du groupe B sous traction mécanique. Mais dans le groupe A traité par traction manuelle, les effets placébo et psychologique aurait probablement joué un rôle plus important.

L’effet de la traction sur l’espace intervertébral a été évalué par plusieurs auteurs en utilisant des postures variables du rachis cervical. Wong et al. [25] ont noté que les espaces intervertébraux antérieur et postérieur étaient augmenté par la traction en position neutre et à 30° de flexion. L’augmentation de l’espace intervertébral antérieur intéressait surtout le disque C4-C5 (12 %) en position neutre et C2-C3 en flexion de 30°. L’espace postérieur était augmenté principalement au niveau du disque C6-C7 (37 %) en position neutre et des disques C6-C7 (20 %) et C5-C6 (19 %) en flexion de 30°. Dans le travail de Hseuh et al. [10], l’élargissement le plus important de l’espace intervertébral postérieur a été noté en flexion de 30° pour les disques C4-C5 et C5-C6 et en flexion de 35° pour les disques C6-C7 et C7-T1. Cet effet a été plus important avec un poids compris entre 15 et 18 kg mais accompagné de cervicalgies après la fin de la traction surtout pour une charge de 18 kg. Vaugh et al. [24] ont utilisé la traction cervicale chez 20 volontaires à 0° et 30° de flexion du rachis cervical. Ils ont noté une augmentation significativement meilleure de l’espace intervertébral antérieur de tous les étages du rachis cervical en position de 0° par rapport à la position de 30° de flexion. Concernant l’espace intervertébral postérieur, son augmentation sous traction était également significative mais sans différence statistique entre les deux positions de 0° et 30° de flexion. Dans notre série, chez les 26 patients ayant été traités par traction manuelle ou mécanique, la position du rachis cervical était neutre ou en légère extension dans 16 cas (61,5 %). En considérant également les données de la littérature déjà citée, nous pensons que la flexion du rachis cervical ne permet pas d’avoir un effet plus important sur l’espace intervertébral postérieur et n’apporte pas une efficacité antalgique supérieure.

L’étude scannographique de Sari et al. [21] a confirmé l’effet biomécanique de la traction cervicale sur le rachis cervical de C2 à C7 avec une élongation de 1,39mm, une réduction de la saillie discale et une augmentation de la surface du canal médullaire de 11,21mm2. L’IRM a été également utilisée pour apprécier l’effet de la traction en flexion cervicale sur la HD et a montré une résolution complète ou une diminution significative de la saillie discale dans 72 % des cas avec une charge de 13,6 kg (30 pounds) [2]. L’IRM a été également utilisée par Liu et al. [14] pour évaluer l’effet de la traction sur les foramens de conjugaison entre les deuxième et septième vertèbres cervicales. Cette traction a été réalisée en position neutre en décubitus dorsal et a entrainé une augmentation de la hauteur du foramen en moyenne de 3,75 %, 8,67 % et 10,43 % avec des poids consécutifs de cinq, dix et 15 kg. L’augmentation de la surface du foramen a été en moyenne de 5,81 %, 16,56 % et 18,9 % pour la même succession de charges. Les auteurs n’ont pas trouvé de différence significative sur le plan de la hauteur et de la surface du foramen entre les charges de dix et 15 kg.

Dans notre série, la traction manuelle qui ne représente pas plus de 6 kg de poids a donné un résultat comparable à la traction mécanique qui a atteint 12 kg de poids. Cela ne confirme pas l’apport de l’effet mécanique de la traction manuelle du moins sur les structures ligamentaires et articulaires mais nous permet de souligner l’intérêt de l’action sur les structures musculaires au cours de la NCB récente. L’amélioration des douleurs qui sont en rapport avec ces structures musculaires peut expliquer une régression, comparable entre les trois groupes de notre série, de la consommation d’antalgiques. Il faut noter que cette composante musculaire a conditionné certainement la tolérance de la traction manuelle réalisée lors du premier examen physique et a donc influencé l’inclusion des patients dans notre étude.

Devant la variabilité des résultats des études évaluant l’effet de la rééducation fonctionnelle et l’absence d’un consensus unanime dans le traitement de la NCB, Cleland et al. [3] ont essayé de mettre en évidence les facteurs prédictifs d’un bon résultat à court terme du traitement physique dans la NCB. Ces auteurs ont isolé huit facteurs : trois recueillis lors de l’interrogatoire (âge<54 ans, membre supérieur dominant non douloureux et « regarder vers le bas non douloureux »), un facteur obtenu lors de l’examen physique (flexion cervicale>30°) et quatre facteurs en rapport avec les moyens physiques utilisés (traction cervicale mécanique, manipulation du rachis dorsal, pas de mobilisation des tissus mous et approche multimodale). L’association des trois premiers facteurs à l’approche rééducative multimodale associant la traction cervicale, la manipulation et le renforcement des fléchisseurs profonds du cou, offre une probabilité d’efficacité de 90 %. Donc, devant la difficulté de trouver un protocole rééducatif standard efficace dans la NCB, l’utilisation d’une approche multimodale comportant entre autres des tractions cervicales manuelles ou mécaniques paraît intéressante. Nous insistons sur l’importance des critères de sélection des patients pour les tractions cervicales intermittentes qui devraient à notre avis comporter une durée d’évolution inférieure à trois mois, une tolérance du test de traction et un choix de la posture du rachis cervical – critères devant être validés avant la prescription du protocole de rééducation. En fin, nous signalons le biais méthodologique dans notre étude qui correspond à l’absence d’insu pour les patients. En effet, les patients du groupe C savent qu’ils ne vont pas avoir de traction contrairement aux deux autres groupes A et B.

Conclusion

Devant des radiculalgies cervicales et spécialement la NCB, le traitement est tout d’abord conservateur avec une approche rééducative multimodale. La traction cervicale intermittente joue un rôle important quand l’indication est bien posée [9, 21]. Une durée d’évolution inférieure à trois mois, une bonne tolérance du test de traction manuelle et un choix correct de la posture du rachis cervical constituent des éléments augmentant les chances d’obtenir de bons résultats. La NCB chronique serait une mauvaise indication à la traction cervicale intermittente. Devant des douleurs radiculaires réfractaires à tous les moyens thérapeutiques conservateurs y compris la traction cervicale, un déficit neurologique progressif ou une myélopathie cervicarthrosique, l’indication chirurgicale devient légitime [6]. Des travaux complémentaires, randomisées et contrôlées sont nécessaires pour confirmer l’efficacité des tractions cervicales et étayer leurs indications en cas de NCB.

References

Carette S., Fehlings M.G. Clinical practice. Cervical radiculopathy N Engl J Med 2005 ;  353 : 392-399 [cross-ref]
Chung T.S., Lee Y.J., Kang S.W., Park C.J., Kang W.S., Shim Y.W. Reducibility of cervical disk herniation: Evaluation at MR imaging during cervical traction with a nonmagnetic traction device Radiology 2002 ;  225 : 895-900 [cross-ref]
Cleland J.A., Fritz J.M., Whitman J.M., Heath R. Predictors of short-term outcome in people with a clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy Phys Ther 2007 ;  87 : 1619-1632
Cleland J.A., Whitman J.M., Fritz J.M., Palmer J.A. Manual physical therapy. cervical traction, and strengthening exercises in patients with cervical radiculopathy: A case series J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2005 ;  35 : 802-811
Constantoyannis C., Konstantinou D., Kourtopoulos H., Papadakis N. Intermittente cervical traction for cervical radiculopathy caused by large-volume herniated disks J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2002 ;  25 : 188-192 [cross-ref]
Ellenberg M.R., Honet J.C., Treanor W.J. Cervical radiculopathy Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1994 ;  75 : 342-352[Review].  [cross-ref]
Gore D.R., Sepic S.B., Gardner G.M., Murray M.P. Neck pain. A long-term follow-up of 205 patients Spine 1987 ;  12 : 1-5 [cross-ref]
Hattori M., Shirai Y., Aoki T. Research on the effectiveness of intermittent cervical traction therapy, using short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials J Orthop Sci 2002 ;  7 : 208-216 [cross-ref]
Heckmann J.G., Lang C.J., Zöbelein I., Laumer R., Druschky A., Neundörfer B. Herniated cervical intervertebral discs with radiculopathy: an outcome study of conservatively or surgically treated patients J Spinal Disord 1999 ;  12 : 396-401 [cross-ref]
Hseuh T.C., Ju M.S., Chou Y.L. Evaluation of the effects of pulling angle and force on intermittent cervical traction with the Saunder’s Halter J Formos Med Assoc 1991 ;  90 : 1234-1239
Ikeda T., Nakamura T., Kikuchi T., Umeda S., Senda H., Takagi K. Patomecanism of spontaneous regression of the herniated lumbar disc: histologic and immunohistochemical study J Spinal Disord 1996 ;  9 : 136-140
Joghataei M.T., Arab A.M., Khaksar H. The effect of cervical traction combined with convensional therapy on grip strength on patients with cervical radiculopathy Clin Rehabil 2004 ;  18 : 879-887 [cross-ref]
Lecocq J, Vautravers P, Ribaud J. Tractions vertébrales. EMC, Kinésithérapie-Médecine physique-Réadaptation, 26-090-A-10, 2005.
Liu J., Ebraheim N.A., Sanford C.G., Patil V., Elsamaloty H., Treuhaft K., and al. Quantitative changes in the cervical neural foramen resulting from axial traction: in vivo imaging study Spine J 2008 ;  8 : 619-623 [cross-ref]
Moeti P., Marchetti G. Clinical outcome from mechanical intermittent cervical traction for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: a case series J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2001 ;  31 : 207-213
Murphy D.R., Hurwitz E.L., Gregory A., Clary R. A nonsurgical approach to the management of patients with cervical radiculopathy: a prospective observational cohort study J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2006 ;  29 : 279-287 [cross-ref]
Oláh M., Molnár L., Doba Ji., Oláh C., Fehér J., Bender T. The effects of weightbath traction hydrotherapy as a component of complex physical therapy in disorders of the cervical and lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up Rheumatol Int 2008 ;  28 : 749-756
Radhakrishan K., Litchy W.J., O’Fallon W.M., Kurland L.T. Epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy: a population-based study from Rochester, Minnesota, 1976 through 1990 Brain 1994 ;  117 : 325-335
Revel M. Whiplash injury of the neck from concepts to facts Ann Readap Med Phys 2003 ;  46 : 158-170 [inter-ref]
Saal J.S., Saal J.A., Yurth E.F. Nonoperative management of herniated cervical intervertebral disc with radiculopathy Spine 1996 ;  21 : 1877-1883 [cross-ref]
Sari H., Akarimak U., Karacan I., Akman H. Evaluation of effects of cervical traction on spinal structures by computerized tomography Advances in physiotherapy 2003 ;  5 : 114-121 [cross-ref]
Shakoor M.A., Ahmed M.S., Kibria G., Khan A.A., Mian M.A., Hasan S.A., and al. Effects of cervical traction and exercise therapy in cervical spondylosis Bangladesh Med Res Counc Bull 2002 ;  28 : 61-69
Swezey R.L., Swezey A.M., Warner K. Efficacy of home cervical traction therapy Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1999 ;  78 : 30-32 [cross-ref]
Vaughn H.T., Having K.M., Rogers J.L. Radiographic analysis of intervertebral separation with a 0 and 30 degrees rope angle using the Saunders cervical traction device Spine 2006 ;  31 : E39-43
Wong A.M., Leong C.P., Chen C.M. The traction angle and cervical intervertebral separation Spine 1992 ;  17 : 136-138
Zylbergold R.S., Piper M.C. Cervical spine disorders: A comparison of three types of traction Spine 1985 ;  10 : 867-871 [cross-ref]



© 2009  Elsevier Masson SAS. All Rights Reserved.
EM-CONSULTE.COM is registrered at the CNIL, déclaration n° 1286925.
As per the Law relating to information storage and personal integrity, you have the right to oppose (art 26 of that law), access (art 34 of that law) and rectify (art 36 of that law) your personal data. You may thus request that your data, should it be inaccurate, incomplete, unclear, outdated, not be used or stored, be corrected, clarified, updated or deleted.
Personal information regarding our website's visitors, including their identity, is confidential.
The owners of this website hereby guarantee to respect the legal confidentiality conditions, applicable in France, and not to disclose this data to third parties.
Close
Article Outline