Article

3 Iconography
Access to the text (HTML) Access to the text (HTML)
PDF Access to the PDF text
Advertising


Access to the full text of this article requires a subscription.
  • If you are a subscriber, please sign in 'My Account' at the top right of the screen.

  • If you want to subscribe to this journal, see our rates



Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume 80, n° 6
pages 1556-1563 (juin 2019)
Doi : 10.1016/j.jaad.2018.08.014
accepted : 5 August 2018
Original Articles

Stigmatizing attitudes toward persons with psoriasis among laypersons and medical students
 

Rebecca L. Pearl, PhD a, b, , Marilyn T. Wan, MBChB, MPH c, Junko Takeshita, MD, PhD, MSCE c, d, Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE c, d
a Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
b Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
c Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
d Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Correspondence to: Rebecca L. Pearl, 3535 Market St, Suite 3026, Philadelphia, PA 19104.3535 Market St, Suite 3026PhiladelphiaPA19104
Abstract
Background

Perceived stigma among patients with psoriasis contributes to poor quality of life.

Objective

To determine the prevalence and predictors of stigmatizing attitudes toward persons with psoriasis among laypersons and medical trainees.

Methods

Laypersons were recruited from Amazon.com's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) (n = 198). Additionally, 187 medical students were recruited via e-mail. Participants completed an online survey in which they viewed images of persons with visible psoriasis. Participants reported their desire to socially avoid the persons in the images, their emotional responses to the persons in the images, and their endorsement of psoriasis-related stereotypes and myths.

Results

MTurk participants endorsed social avoidance items such as not wanting to shake hands with (39.4%) or have the persons in the images in their home (32.3%). Participants stereotyped persons with psoriasis as contagious (27.3%) and endorsed the myth that psoriasis is not a serious disease (26.8%). Linear regression analyses showed that having heard of or knowing someone with psoriasis predicted fewer stigmatizing attitudes (P  < .05). The medical students reported less stigmatizing attitudes than the MTurk participants (P  < .01).

Limitations

Self-report, single-institution study.

Conclusion

Stigmatizing views of persons with psoriasis are prevalent among people in the United States. Educational campaigns for the public and medical trainees may reduce stigma toward persons with psoriasis.

The full text of this article is available in PDF format.

Key words : attitudes, laypersons, medical education, psoriasis, stigma

Abbreviations used : ANCOVA, CI, MTurk, OR, QOL



 Funding sources: Supported by a grant from the Edwin and Fannie Gray Hall Center for Human Appearance at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr Pearl is supported in part by a mentored patient-oriented research career development award from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute/National Institutes of Health (grant K23HL140176). Dr Takeshita is supported in part by a mentored patient-oriented research career development award from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases/National Institutes of Health (grant 5K23AR068433).
 Disclosure: Dr Gelfand served as a consultant for Bristol-Myers Squibb, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen Biologics, Novartis Corp, Regeneron, UCB (Data Safety and Monitoring Board), and Sanofi and Pfizer Inc, receiving honoraria; in addition, he receives research grants (to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania) from Abbvie, Janssen, Novartis Corp, Sanofi, Celgene, Ortho Dermatologics, and Pfizer Inc, and he has received payment for CME work related to psoriasis that was supported indirectly by Eli Lilly and Company and Ortho Dermatologics. In addition, Dr Gelfand is a copatent holder of resiquimod for treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and he is a deputy editor for the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , receiving honoraria from the Society for Investigative Dermatology. Dr Takeshita receives a research grant from Pfizer Inc (to the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania) and has received payment for CME work related to psoriasis that was supported indirectly by Eli Lilly and Company and Novartis. Dr Pearl and Dr Wan have no conflicts of interest to disclose.
 A preliminary analysis of the current data was presented at the 2018 Meeting International Investigative Dermatology, Orlando, FL, May 16-19, 2018.

  (the 3 participants selected the same rating for all items in all scales).


© 2018  American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.@@#104156@@
EM-CONSULTE.COM is registrered at the CNIL, déclaration n° 1286925.
As per the Law relating to information storage and personal integrity, you have the right to oppose (art 26 of that law), access (art 34 of that law) and rectify (art 36 of that law) your personal data. You may thus request that your data, should it be inaccurate, incomplete, unclear, outdated, not be used or stored, be corrected, clarified, updated or deleted.
Personal information regarding our website's visitors, including their identity, is confidential.
The owners of this website hereby guarantee to respect the legal confidentiality conditions, applicable in France, and not to disclose this data to third parties.
Close
Article Outline