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Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume 57, n° 4
pages 555-572 (octobre 2007)
Doi : 10.1016/j.jaad.2007.06.032
Continuing Medical Education

Screening, early detection, and trends for melanoma: Current status (2000-2006) and future directions
 

Alan C. Geller, MPH, RN a, b, , Susan M. Swetter, MD c, Katie Brooks, MPH a, Marie-France Demierre, MD a, Amy L. Yaroch, PhD d
a Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 
b Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 
c Stanford University and the Veteran’s Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 
d Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 

Reprint requests: Alan C. Geller, MPH, RN, Boston University School of Medicine, DOB 801A, 720 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118.
Abstract

In the past 5 years, there have been notable strides toward the earlier recognition and discovery of melanoma, including new technologies to complement and augment the clinical examination and new insights to help clinicians recognize early melanoma. However, incidence and mortality rates throughout most of the developed world have risen over the past 25 years, while education and screening, potentially the best means for reducing the disease, continue to be severely underutilized. Much progress needs to be made to reach middle-aged and older men and persons of lower socioeconomic status who suffer a disproportionate burden of death from melanoma. Worldwide melanoma control must also be a priority, and comprehensive educational and screening programs should be directed to Northern Ireland and a number of Eastern European nations, whose 5-year survival rates range between 53% and 60%, mirroring those of the United States and Australia more than 40 years ago.

Learning objective

After completing this learning activity, participants should be aware of the most recent melanoma epidemiologic data, both in the United States and internationally; worldwide early detection and screening programs; clinical strategies to recognize and improve the detection of early melanoma; the latest technologies for early detection of melanoma; and public and professional education programs designed to enhance early detection.

The full text of this article is available in PDF format.

Abbreviations used : AAD, ABCD, ACS, BSCT, CAMS, CNMD, CI, DN, FDR, GP, HRNCAMS, IOM, LMM, NM, NMSC, OR, PCP, PLC, QALY, SEER, SES, SSE, SSM



 Funding sources: National Cancer Institute.
 Conflicts of interest: None declared.



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