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Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume 63, n° 5
pages 805-814 (novembre 2010)
Doi : 10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.066
accepted : 3 August 2009
Original Articles

Nevus simplex: A reconsideration of nomenclature, sites of involvement, and disease associations
 

Anna M. Juern, MD a, Zoey R. Glick, MD b, Beth A. Drolet, MD a, Ilona J. Frieden, MD c,
a Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
b George Washington University Medical School, Washington, DC 
c University of California, San Francisco, California 

Reprint requests: Ilona J Frieden, MD, University of California, San Francisco, Department of Dermatology, Box 0316, San Francisco, CA 94143-0316.
Abstract
Background

Nevus simplex (NS) is a common birthmark on the forehead, glabella, upper eyelids, and nape. More widespread involvement can be confused with port-wine stains (nevus flammeus) and other vascular birthmarks.

Objectives

To further categorize the anatomic locations in infants with extensive NS and evaluate for any possible disease associations.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective review of patients with extensive NS seen at two tertiary care centers.

Results

Twenty-seven patients with extensive NS were identified. All had at least one typical site of involvement: glabella (77.8%), nape (59.3%), and eyelids (55.6%). Additional sites were the scalp, including the vertex, occiput, parietal (66.7%); nose (66.7%); lip (59.2%); lumbosacral skin (55.6%); and upper and mid back (14.8 %).

Limitations

Retrospective nature of the study and relatively small sample size.

Conclusions

We propose the term “nevus simplex complex” for NS with more widespread involvement beyond the typical sites. Consistent use of the term “nevus simplex” will aid in correct diagnosis and appropriate management of these birthmarks.

The full text of this article is available in PDF format.

Abbreviations used : BWS, IH, NS



 Funding sources: None.
 Conflicts of interest: None declared.

  Unpublished observations, Ilona Frieden, April 2009.


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